Posts Tagged ‘ Atlas Corps ’

A Chance (Every Day) to Vote for ServeNext, Atlas Corps, and other Groups

ServeNext— the organization whose mission is to expand opportunities in voluntary service as a way to address social ills and strengthen democracy— is participating in this month’s Pepsi Refresh Project.

So is Atlas Corps, the international service corps with the online contest Midas Touch.

And you can vote for them both every day in February.

While online contests to benefit nonprofits have been questioned recently (especially the recent Chase Giving contest, which my organization Idealist took part in and won money from), the Pepsi contest is ostensibly trying to do something Continue reading

Atlas Corps Wins $10K in America’s Giving Challenge – Recruiting for Spring 2010 Fellowships in Colombia + Needs Your Support for Another Online Contest

Atlas Corps earned over $32,000 recently in America’s Giving Challenge, which counted the number of daily donors to Atlas Corps through Facebook Causes. Because of its fabulous showing, the organization won an additional $10,000 as top winner in the contest.

Atlas Corps, the fairly new service corps that uniquely recruits skilled international and U.S. volunteers to serve in U.S.- and Bogota-based nonprofits for a year, attracted over 2,500 donations in about a month through the contest.

Now Atlas Corps is hoping to get your click – no financial donation necessary — to sweep the Chase Community Giving contest on Facebook which ends Dec. 11th. Chase is donating a total of $5 million in the contest to organizations who Continue reading

Atlas Corps Needs Your Help to Win America’s Giving Challenge

Last year, Atlas Corps won America’s Giving Challenge, and this year it’s in the running again — but it needs the support of people like you who care about service, crossing borders, and professional development for people dedicated to working in social impact careers from all over the world.

Atlas Corps, a year-long international service fellowship which sends U.S. residents abroad as well as brings foreign nationals to the United States to serve in nonprofits, is currently in sixth place in the overall competition that rewards the number of daily donors, not the total amount raised through the competition. Your daily donation of $10 can help Atlas Corps win, as it did last year.

See the standings — for today and “all-time” for this year’s competition — here.

America’s Giving Challenge, which takes place using the Facebook Causes platform, is co-sponsored by the Case Foundation, the W.G. Kellogg Foundation, and Parade Magazine, among other groups. According to the rules:

$50,000 will be awarded to the cause with the highest total number of unique daily donations over the 30 days of the Challenge. $25,000 will be awarded to the causes with the second and third highest total number of unique daily donations over the 30 days of the Challenge. $10,000 will be awarded to the next five causes with the highest total number of unique daily donations over the 30 days of the Challenge.

So far, over $1.3 million dollars has been donated to 7,600+ organizations, through the competition—by over 70,000 donors. Atlas Corps’s had nearly 2000 donors.

Last year Atlas Corps not only raised $33,000 through America’s Giving Challenge, but also won the $50,000 grand prize for having the most donors. The organization, headed by Scott Beale, went onto to win $20,000 from an online Ideablob competition. (Read more about these online contests here.)

I plan to donate daily this week because I believe that Atlas Corps’s mission of bringing nonprofit professionals from the Global South to serve in the U.S. nonprofit sector stands to strengthen our perspectives as well as help us discover new ways of solving problems. As a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, I also admire Atlas Corps’s efforts to send mid-career U.S. nonprofit professionals overseas — people who have a great deal of targeted skills, and who already speak the host country language fluently and can jump into short-term, high-skill roles at partner organizations. Atlas Corps is completely privately funded, and has only recently emerged from its pilot phase.

Learn more about Atlas Corps:

And please consider donating to Atlas Corps as part of America’s Giving Challenge.

Business Professionals Forced to Wait Longer for Peace Corps Assignments

A couple of weeks ago I wrote about the very tight funnel through which Peace Corps sends all applicants, for increasingly fewer Volunteer spots around the world. (It’s complicated — you might want to read that post.)

I wrote about the plight of generalists —the well-educated applicants who can learn to do different assignments well, but aren’t specialists in any fields currently requested by Peace Corps host countries — whose application numbers far exceed the number of open generalist Volunteer positions due to recent budget woes.

This past Monday, when next year’s Volunteer positions opened up for nomination, the problem wasn’t for the generalists. Most generalist openings have been delayed a couple more weeks.

The people who got shut out of Peace Corps this time around were the business professionals, in some cases people with 30 years of business experience. Peace Corps’s two assignments that require a background in business include:

  • Business Advising — requiring either a Bachelors in a business-related discipline, or a high school diploma and four years of business management experience. These Volunteers help people in their communities plan and Continue reading

Atlas Corps Deadline Extended for Candidates from the U.S., East Asia and Brazil

Atlas Corps — the international service and exchange corps for nonprofit professionals — has extended its deadline for candidates from the United States, East Asia, and Brazil.

Over 500 candidates have applied for the Atlas Corps Fellowship.In all cases the earlier the application is received the better, so if you want to apply, please do so as soon as possible. They are beginning to review applications now.

Atlas Corps seeks nonprofit leaders from the United States

All candidates must have a college degree, 2+ years of nonprofit experiences and Spanish proficiency. The particular skills we hope to find include candidates with capacity building, business consulting, fundraising and social entrepreneurship. Deadline has been extended to April 8, read more or address questions to applybogota [at] atlascorps.org.

Atlas Corps seeks nonprofit leaders from East Asia

All candidates must have a college degree, 2+ years of nonprofit experience, and English proficiency. The primary position we are recruiting for is a “Girls Leadership Program Coordinator” at Asian American Lead, so candidates with experience working with youth development and after school education would be a good match.  Deadline has been extended to April 12, read more and address questions to apply [at] atlascorps.org.

Atlas Corps seeks nonprofit leaders from Brazil

All candidates must have a college degree, 2+ years of nonprofit experiences and English proficiency. The primary organization we are recruiting for is the International Center for Missing and Exploited Children, so a candidate with experience with the issues of child sexual exploitation and international abduction would be a good match. Deadline has been extended to April 8. Read more and address questions to apply [at] atlascorps.org.

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Why It’s Wrong to Assume that All Service Participants are Young

How branding national service as an opportunity only for young people does more harm to the movement than good.

Christian Witkin for TIME Magazine

Christian Witkin for TIME Magazine

While many service corps do have upper age limits — City Year, AmeriCorps*NCCC, Public Allies, and many other team-based programs — most programs do not have an upper age limit.

In fact, several programs specifically recruit professionalsExperience Corps, Atlas Corps, CUSO-VSO (the Canadian VSO), Volunteers for Prosperity, and United Nations Volunteers just to name a few. Others like Peace Corps and AmeriCorps*VISTA recruit almost entirely college graduates because of the skill required in carrying out service.

And yet when people speak of service they almost always describe it as an opportunity for young people to give back, receive scholarship money, develop leadership skills, and go an an adventure before settling down with a real job.

What difference does it make if most people think of national or international service as a pursuit for the young?

Here are some reasons:

Recruitment:

If we assume only young people will enlist in a citizen service corps, we won’t recruit new corps members as creatively Continue reading

New Podcast Episode: Scott Beale from Atlas Corps!

atlas-corps-logoNew podcast episode from Idealist features the founder and head of Atlas Corps.

The latest New Service podcast series features Scott Beale, Founder and Executive Director of Atlas Corps, a service and exchange corps for professionals in the NGO sector. Also known as a “two-way Peace Corps,” Atlas Corps brings rising professionals from NGOs in the Global South to the United States to serve for a year; U.S. professionals find opportunities to serve at NGOs in Colombia, India, and soon, elsewhere.

Atlas Corps has just started accepting applications for the 2009-10 fellowship year.

Scott Beale

In the show, Scott and I talk about the need for professional global exchanges, starting up a new service corps, and his experiences that led to developing Atlas Corps.

You can download the episode now or subscribe to our podcast (opens iTunes).

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