Final Nonprofit Career Month Simulcast: How can national service members set themselves up for success during the term?

To join this free presentation, please refer to the login information below.

October 30th — 2:00pm Eastern/11:00am Pacific
How can national service members set themselves up for success during the term?

What can you do to make the most of your term of service so that your career transition is fulfilling rather than intimidating?

  • Discerning your next steps (through evaluation, reflection, and other specific exercises)
  • Building additional, strategic relationships and skills that put you closer to your goals
  • Documenting and displaying your accomplishments to impress potential employers or admissions committees
  • Learning the nuts and bolts of a job search as your service term nears an end

This simulcast offers national service participants detailed specific steps and necessary tools to emphasize their own professional development, even as they are tackling intractable social concerns and building a better community through their service. The simulcast emphasizes practical suggestions, given corps members’ budget and time constraints, diverse activities, and varied program resources.

To access today’s free presentation, click here for the web portion at 11 am PT/2 m ET, and call in here:

Toll-free number: 1-877-802-4003
Participant Passcode: 718097

Want to learn more about simulcasts, how to sign up, and what technical set up you’ll need, read our Simulcast FAQ.

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Free Webcast Today: Nonprofit Career Tips with Meg Busse and Steve Joiner

Posted as part of Nonprofit Career Month, featuring the diversity of career opportunities in the nonprofit sector.

Today, Tuesday, October 20, as Idealist hosts a Nonprofit Career Fair together with Seattle University, we will also run a live webcast during an accompanying information session, “Connecting Intention to Action. Connecting Action to Career” (1:30-2:30 pm PST).

Meg Busse and Steve Joiner, Directors of the Career Transitions Program here at Idealist, will lead this workshop.

They’ll take a holistic view of the career search by helping participants to:

  • See themselves and their career paths in a more complex and complete way
  • Understand several self-assessment tools that will help them articulate their experiences, skills, values, and priorities in a compelling way
  • Explore the “nuts and bolts” of the nonprofit sector in order to gain a larger view of how they might fit in
  • Explore ways to create intentional opportunities with organizations by exploring the synergy between their self and sector understanding

This event will also be offered as a free webcast to the first 150 attendees who register.

If you are interested in joining us via the web, here is the log-in information:

To access the presentation, click here.
To call in, dial: 866-740-1260
Enter the code: 2270113

To learn more: http://www.nonprofitcareermonth.org/simulcasts

Join the Online Career Chat “Breaking into the Sector”

This Thursday, October 8th at noon ET, Idealist.org will partner with the Chronicle of Philanthropy for an online chat on Breaking into the Sector.

An intensely competitive job market is making it harder than ever for recent graduates and established business professionals to break into careers in the nonprofit world.

  • What can you do to stand out from the crowd?
  • What can you do to make sure you are an attractive candidate for a great new role when conditions improve?
  • And if you do land a position, what should you do to make the most of your opportunity?

Career transition experts Meg Busse and Steve Joiner (authors of the Idealist.org Guides to Nonprofit Careers and our Career Corner advice column) and nonprofit leader Rosetta Thurman will answer these questions and more.

We hope you will join us Thursday.

Career Transitions: Exploring Your Options for Life After AmeriCorps

Contributed originally to the Nonprofit Career Month blog by Magdalena Montagne the Effective Practices Project Coordinator at the Resource Center.

People come to national and community service for a variety of reasons. As a young person, my desire to help children along with a love of reading led me to the America Reads program. I was considering becoming a teacher and this was one way I could check it out while also getting first-hand experience in several different classrooms (both elementary and middle school) and having the chance to observe some amazing teachers in action.

Of course, the real power was with the relationships I made with those students who were struggling to read. Every day I felt I was helping someone. This kept me engaged in a way that hadn’t happened in previous jobs, and before I knew it the service year was coming to a close. However, I hadn’t made a plan for what to do next. It wasn’t until several years — and several jobs — later, Continue reading

Career Transitions: October is Nonprofit Career Month

A new campaign highlights professional opportunities in the nonprofit sector.

Whether you are just starting to think about working in the nonprofit sectorncm_needsyou_200w professionally after your term ends, or you are a seasoned nonprofit leader, Nonprofit Career Month is a new, pilot opportunity for you to discover ways to act on your passions through professional opportunities in the nonprofit (or independent, or nongovernmental, or third…) sector.

You can connect with the month of activities — and create your own! — in a variety of ways. Driven by the collective contributions of the nonprofit community, the campaign dispels common myths about nonprofit work, provides individuals with entry points to the sector, and allows current and aspiring nonprofit professionals to share expertise.

The brand new website NonprofitCareerMonth.org features:

New Podcast: South Carolina Nonprofit Leader Mac Bennett of the United Way of the Midlands

Mac Bennett

Mac Bennett

A new podcast series features nonprofit leaders throughout the country.

October is Nonprofit Career Month, a month of activities to promote the diversity of career opportunities in the nation’s nonprofit sector. Driven by the collective contributions of the nonprofit community, the campaign dispels common myths about nonprofit work, provides you with entry points to the sector, and allows current and aspiring nonprofit professionals to share expertise.

Launching our Nonprofit Career Month podcast series is a discussion with Mac Bennett who shares his experiences and insights from 30 years of nonprofit leadership. Since March 2005, Mac Bennett has served as President and Chief Executive Officer of United Way of the Midlands in Columbia, SC.

Mac studied finance and management at the University of South Carolina, and then blazed a career in public service, first holding a variety of leadership positions with the University of South Carolina and then serving as Executive Director of the Central Carolina Community Foundation.

Bennett is also a founding director of the South Carolina Association of Nonprofit Organizations (SCANPO). Throughout his career, Bennett has been instrumental in efforts to improve training and education for people working in the nonprofit sector.

I chatted with Mac about making a difference while making a living; how Mac got started as a volunteer in the sector; the variety of ways to serve your community; and Jim Collin’s book Good to Great and the Social Sectors.

AmeriCorps — a Great First “Job”

Sarah Stankorb, The Corps Network

Sarah Stankorb, The Corps Network

This post was contributed by former AmeriCorps member and staffer at The Corps Network Sarah Stankorb.

A good number of my friends have suddenly found themselves precariously and unintentionally unemployed. Hearing their stories of frustration, the heaps of resumes they’ve had to send out each week, and the dull quiet of phones that have failed to ring, I can’t help but think back to my first bout with unemployment.

I was about to graduate from college (something neither of my parents had done), and I had absolutely no idea what I wanted to do with my life. I had nearly earned a philosophy degree and was not finding myself to be particularly employable. Worse yet, there was no clear next step for me. I was in uncharted waters.

A professor of mine, helping me contemplate whether graduate school or the workforce were the next best home for me, Continue reading